Risk Management

 

Phi Mu Delta/FIPG Risk Management Policies

Phi Mu Delta has been a proud member of the Fraternity Information & Programming Group (FIPG) for over ten years!  FIPG provides standard risk management policies that are followed throughout the Greek community.  Policies are regularly monitored and updated to reflect changes in the law.  Most importantly, Phi Mu Delta's risk management policies are in place to keep our members and their guests as safe as possible.  We are committed to the prevention of hazing, mature and responsible use of alcohol, and the elimination of sexual assault and harassment.

General Questions

1. Why is liability insurance so expensive for Greek letter organizations?

We have seen a continuing increase in civil litigation arising from fraternity social functions, pledge/new member activities, and related activities. Jury verdicts and settlements from these lawsuits continue to increase. One large jury verdict could put any national organization and therefore all of its chapters out of business.

2. Why is everyone cracking down on us?

The "Animal House" image of the 1970s is no longer tolerated. People are fed up. Universities are shutting down their Greek systems. Parents won't let their sons and daughters join chapters. City and county zoning boards won't grant building variances for chapter houses. Leaders of all men's and women's fraternities are being pushed to find solutions to the values-related problems facing fraternal groups. The most distressing concern is the increasing number of men and women who die or are injured each year because of hazing practices and alcohol-related fraternity functions.

3. Why have a risk management program?

Today's insurance market is not a good place for the college fraternity chapter. At best, insurance is difficult to get, and affordable premiums are almost impossible to find. By adopting a standard risk management policy and through individual national organizations enforcing that policy, we make the Greek environment safer for our guests and members and more attractive to insurance companies who are willing to consider writing fraternal organizations. Plaintiffs’ attorneys take the “shotgun” approach to litigation. Lawsuits name the national organization, the alumnae/i corporation, the chapter as an entity, individual officers and members, and on occasion the parents of fraternity brothers and sisters. They are looking for the deep pocket(s) - the sources with the most money.

4. What organizations are members of FIPG?

The national organizations in FIPG represent over seventy percent of all men's and women's fraternity members in North America.